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Billy Joel attends elementary school’s tribute concert

Billy Joel attends elementary school’s tribute concert

Billy Joel participates in a press conference to announce "Billy Joel at the Garden," the first ever music franchise held at the venue, at Madison Square Garden. The music icon will perform a residency at Madison Square Garden once a month for as many months as New Yorkers demand. Photo: Associated Press/Greg Allen/Invision

Billy Joel paid a visit to a New York school on Wednesday to watch pupils perform a special tribute concert based on his music.

Students at the Deasy Elementary School, aged five to eight, put on a performance featuring 15 songs from Joel’s career, and teachers at the school sent the Piano Man an invitation.

Joel accepted the invite and reportedly arrived on his motorcycle shortly before the curtain went up, before taking a seat in the back row for the entire performance.

School Principal Nomi Rosen tells Newsday, “We invited Billy Joel on a lark, but we didn’t expect him to come. It was totally thrilling. We were all beside ourselves. I asked him if he wanted to sit in front, but he said he would rather stay in the back so he wouldn’t make the kids nervous.”

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