News

‘Gluten-free’ labeling standards kick in

‘Gluten-free’ labeling standards kick in

GLUTEN FREE: Starting this week, "gluten free" labels on packaged foods have real meaning. Until now, the term "gluten free" had not been regulated, and manufacturers made their own decisions about what it means. Photo: Associated Press/Jon Elswick

MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Starting this week, “gluten-free” labels on packaged foods have real meaning.

Until now, the term “gluten-free” had not been regulated, and manufacturers made their own decisions about what it means.

This new requirement is especially important for people who suffer from celiac disease and don’t absorb nutrients well. They can get sick from the gluten found in wheat and other cereal grains.

Food manufacturers faced a Tuesday deadline to ensure that anything labeled gluten-free contains less than 20 parts per million of gluten — ensuring that those products are technically free of wheat, rye and barley.

That amount is generally recognized by the medical community to be low enough so that most people who have celiac disease won’t get sick if they eat it.

News from ClarksvilleNow.com

zika-1170x740

yesterday in News

First case of Zika virus reported in TN

The individual had recently traveled to South America before returning to east Tennessee.

nashville-fire

yesterday in News

State Fire Marshal renews hoverboard warning after Nashville fires

Nashville Fire investigators shared details of their investigation.

Senator Mark Green

yesterday in News

Senate approves “Care Alert” to help find missing people with disabilities

Senate Bill 1485, sponsored by Senator Mark Green (R-Clarksville), extends the definition of a missing citizen.

GAVEL-COURT-LAW-CLIPART

yesterday in News

Montgomery County publicly censured for misconduct

Travis Nathaniel Meeks’ actions violated Tennessee Rules of Professional Conduct, among others.

David-Greer

yesterday in Business, Lifestyle, News

Android phone app developed by Clarksville man helps readers

David Greer of Claksville helped create an app that helps people read without their reading glasses.