News

Man who took Nintendo from playing cards to video games dies

Man who took Nintendo from playing cards to video games dies

In this Friday, June 12, 1992 file photo, Hiroshi Yamauchi, then-president of Japan's Nintendo Co., answers questions during a news conference at the company's head office in Kyoto, western Japan. Photo: Associated Press

TOKYO (AP) — Hiroshi Yamauchi, who ran Nintendo for more than 50 years and led the Japanese company’s transition from traditional playing-card maker to video game giant, has died. He was 85.

Kyoto-based Nintendo said Yamauchi, who owned the Seattle Mariners major league baseball club before selling it to Nintendo’s U.S. unit in 2004, died Thursday of pneumonia at a hospital in central Japan.

Yamauchi was company president from 1949 to 2002 and engineered Nintendo’s global growth, including developing the early Family Computer consoles and Game Boy portables.

Nintendo was founded in 1889 and made traditional playing cards before venturing into video games.

Yamauchi is survived by Katsuhito Yamauchi, his eldest son. The company declined to release other family details.

Funeral services are scheduled for Sunday at Nintendo.

News from ClarksvilleNow.com

mobile-pantry

yesterday in News

Mobile pantry to offer food boxes for those in need

Those who need assistance can visit Burt Elementary School Saturday.

water-leak

yesterday in News

Boil Water Advisory issued in Crofton, Ky

Customers should boil their water for a minimum of two minutes before use.

money clipart

yesterday in Crime, News

Victim loses $1,500 in Craigslist vehicle scam

The woman attempted to purchase the car through eBay Motors using Reloadit cards.

beer-sales

yesterday in Crime, News

Four businesses cited for underage alcohol sales

The Clarksville Police Department’s Special Operations Unit conducted compliance checks Jan. 23.

gavel

yesterday in News

Group to examine Tennessee sentencing laws, recidivism

Tennessee’s current sentencing structure has been in place for more than 20 years.